Sherds

News items as well as other noteworthy articles from around the web are collected here and shared, with links to their original sources. Did we miss something? Feel free to let us know.

Remixing Trojan Women

Published ago

Remixing Trojan Women

© National Theatre of Korea

Singaporean director Ong Keng Sen has remixed Euripedes’ classical Greek tragedy Trojan Women, which deals with the suffering of women after war, with Korean opera. In the article, Corrie Tan notes that “Ong has also managed to subvert it by queering the role of Helen of Troy. Ong wanted to situate Helen as an outsider, separate from and vilified by the Trojan women, the survivors of the war.”

Read it at The Guardian »

Remains of horse discovered at Pompeii

Published ago

Remains of horse discovered at Pompeii

© Parco Archeologico di Pompei

During excavations just outside of the city walls of Pompeii, archaeologists have discovered the remains of a horse that perished as a result of the volcanic eruption of AD 79. Liquid plaster was injected into the hollow left by the horse so that its shape is perfectly preserved. The structure in which the remains were found has been identified as a stable.

Read it at The Local.it »

Hun migrations linked to plague

Published ago

Hun migrations linked to plague

© BBC News

Based on DNA analysis of 137 human skeletons from the Eurasian steppe, scientists claim that the deadly Justinian Plague of AD 541, which killed perhaps as many as 25 million people, may have originated in Asia. They suggest that the plague was brought west by the Hun peoples.

Read it at BBC News »

Tomb of general discovered at Saqqara

Published ago

Tomb of general discovered at Saqqara

© Ahram Online

A professor from Cairo University has announced the discovery of a new tomb at Saqqara. According to the excavators, it belonged to General Iwrkhy, who lived during the reign of King Ramesses II, also known as Ramesses the Great (r. 1279–1213 BC). The tomb was discovered at Saqqara south of the causeway of King Unas during the 2017/2018 excavation season.

Read it at Ahram Online »

Getting old in ancient Egypt

Published ago

Getting old in ancient Egypt

© Metropolitan Museum

An interesting article by Grigorios I. Kontopoulos about getting old in ancient Egypt. From the article: “The Egyptian approach to old age is thus closer to our own than we might have expected. The poor and the middle class took in their elderly and struggled, while the wealthiest schemed to avoid taxes.”

Read it at ASOR »

Archaeological evidence for slaughter near Krefeld, Germany

Published ago

Archaeological evidence for slaughter near Krefeld, Germany

© DPA

Archaeologists in Krefeld announced in April that they have unearthed tens of thousands of artefacts in the sand and clay near the Rhine River that can be connected to a large and bloody battle fought between the Romans and the Batavians in AD 69. According to archaeologist Hans-Peter Schletter: “This is one of the very rare cases where archaeology and historical sources are in accord.”

Read it at The Local.de »

Rodin and the art of ancient Greece

Published ago

Rodin and the art of ancient Greece

© Musée Rodin

The British Museum has launched a new exhibition called “Rodin and the art of ancient Greece” (26 April to 29 July 2018). That the British Museum is hosting this exhibition is only fitting, since Rodin was impressed by his own visit to that venerable instution. As Laura Cumming puts it, “To see the Parthenon marbles all together was to view a miracle in fragments – a disembodied head, a single foot, an expressively clenched muscle. The experience unleashes his obsession with parts, and partial forms.”

Read it at The Guardian »