Ancient Greece

In the ancient world, the Greek world encompassed a far larger area than that currently occupied by the modern country of Greece. In the first half of the first millennium BC, they spread to the western coast of Asia Minor, Southern Italy, Sicily, Spain, southern France, and the coast of the Black Sea. By the fourth century BC, the Athenian philosopher Plato was able to state that the Greeks had spread around the Mediterranean Sea “like frogs around a pond” (Phaedo 109b).

The Alexander Sarcophagus

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The Alexander Sarcophagus

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An interesting, if perhaps not highly informative ancient object, is the so-called Alexander Sarcophagus.

Homer and history

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Homer and history

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Can the Homeric epics be considered historical documents to some extent? If so, for which time period can they be used?

The grief of Achilles

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The grief of Achilles

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Achilles was inconsolable after the brutal death of Patroclus. But what was the precise nature of the Greek champion’s grief?

Asteropaeus

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Asteropaeus

The ambidextrous hero

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The Homeric epics are rife with descriptions of colourful characters, including Asteropaeus, who fought with two swords.

A look at Lydian warfare

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A look at Lydian warfare

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Before the rise of the Persian Empire, the kingdom of Lydia was the most powerful neighbour to the ancient Greeks.

A Western way of war?

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A Western way of war?

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The notion of a typical “Western” way of war, as espoused most clearly by Victor Davis Hanson, is problematic to say the least.