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Romans

Curating in colour

Curating in colour

Seeing Blackness in post-18th century Greco-Roman collecting culture

Our understanding of ethnic diversity within the classical world owes much to how museums have curated their Greco-Roman antiquities. These collections were strongly influenced by the interests and values of the original collectors themselves, many of whom were antiquarians living and working in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. This article raises the question of whether their traditions have had an impact on how we understand and curate Black bodies in Greco-Roman galleries today.

Written by Rheba Macha

The state of the state

The state of the state

Why it matters for the ancient world

The most studied aspect of the ancient world is its political history. Whether it’s a critical narrative of Roman history or a detailed look at the structure of the polis, politics are central. But how we understand politics and its ostensibly substantive equivalent, the state, is no less subjective than any other aspect of historical analysis. However, this subjectivity is often overlooked.

Written by Joshua R. Hall

Mithra-ndir

Mithra-ndir

Gandalf and the Roman cult of Mithras

J.R.R. Tolkien described The Lord of the Rings as a fundamentally Catholic work. But a close reading of the epic novel reveals many more influences, including a connection between Mithras and the wizard Gandalf, whose Elvish name is Mithrandir.

Written by Alicia Matz

Warfare and Society in the Barbarian West

Warfare and Society in the Barbarian West

A book from 2003 by Guy Halsall

People studying the first half of antiquity, with free cities and omens and cuneiform, don’t always pay attention to the very end, with kingdoms and Christians and clumsy Latin. But the people studying the end of antiquity have some exciting stories to tell, and they face some of the same problems as people studying Early Greece.

Written by Sean Manning