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Romans

Medusa at the edge of Empire

Medusa at the edge of Empire

Images of the head of Medusa, the mythical gorgon beheaded by Perseus, were used throughout the Classical world as a symbol of power and protection. In this article, Adam Parker explores her presence in Roman Britain, at the edge of the Roman Empire.

Written by Adam Parker

A temple for all the gods

A temple for all the gods

The Pantheon in Rome

One of the most impressive structures of ancient Rome, the Pantheon was a temple dedicated to all the gods. The main room consisted of a large cylindrical drum topped by a dome, with a central hole or oculus allowing for light and air – and rain! – to pass through.

Written by Josho Brouwers

Nisus and Euryalus

Nisus and Euryalus

Poetry as philosophy

How should readers of Virgil’s Aeneid interpret the relationship between the Trojan soldiers Nisus and Euryalus? Harrison Voss argues that the pair is best understood as a depiction of the “ideal” pederastic relationship described in Plato’s Symposium.

Written by Harrison Voss

Shut up, woman!

Shut up, woman!

The Apocryphal Acts of Paul and Thecla and their impact

The Apocryphal Acts of Paul and Thecla is a fascinating read that enjoyed wide popularity for centuries. It presented Thecla as a powerful figure who overshadows Paul. Thecla made an unexpected decision which meant that through Christianity she was actually liberated from the concerns of the body and from the dominion of a future marriage.

Written by Despina Iosif

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